Tag Archives: law firms

How to Inspire Bubba to Do Client Development; Start with “Cut and Paste”

Samira Mery Lineberger, Esq.
 
“It’s what you learn after you know it all that counts.”      Harry S. Truman

Years ago, when law firms still had typewriters on every secretary’s desk, and “real lawyers” didn’t type, I came off a pregnancy leave to find that my secretary had been moved to another group and I was left with psycho secretary (I swear she was that way when I got there).  Shortly after my return, psycho went on mental health leave.  I was working for a large company that was required to keep her position open during her period of “illness.”  That left me with a revolving door of temps.  This was particularly difficult as I was practicing litigation at the time with its many intensive deadlines, and was helpless to get a document out the door.  After a few months of this Twilight Zone like push and pull to keep from committing malpractice, the company bought word processors for all its lawyers.  My desperation managed to get me over my terrifying fear of this “new” windows technology (okay, yes, I’m no spring chicken), and I taught myself to word process.  I got so into it, before long I was creating all sorts of shortcuts and macros to speed up my production.

Several months later, when I was still the only lawyer using the computer for more than just checking internal email (there was still no Internet), the Vice President of the Law Department dropped in my office for a visit.  He took one look at my computer screen and was fascinated with my set up.  Before I knew it, I was teaching the company lawyers to use the computer. 

Understanding that most lawyers did not have psycho secretaries keeping them from meeting their deadlines, I had to devise a way to get lawyers to buy into the idea that the computer was their friend, and that eventually it would make their lives easier.  However, expecting them to dramatically change the way they did their work was not a realistic solution.  So I broke it into baby steps deciding to teach them very little at a time.  Eventually, I speculated, they would see the benefit and begin to teach themselves.  My first lesson was a desk-to-desk session on opening a document and learning to “cut and paste.”  The lawyer would do that for a few weeks before receiving their next instruction.   The next lesson was to type some simple revisions, followed a few weeks later by a “save as” lesson.  It was actually quite remarkable how little I had to do after that.  Once the lawyers got over the hump of dealing with a tiny change, they started to appreciate the results, quickly bought into the process and started teaching themselves.

Getting lawyers to engage in client development can be very similar.  At first it seems like a daunting task.  There is that vague insecurity of not being sure what to do, followed by a gut feeling that lots of time will be wasted and that the efforts may never lead to new business.  There is that pressure of knowing that there is still billable legal work to knock out, and that whatever time is squeezed in for client development will be spent just trying to figure out what to do.  When lawyers work on cases, they can immediately see the benefits and get instant gratification for their efforts.  But with client development, patience is a prerequisite.  It could take months before efforts actually result in a new client.  Like learning how to use a computer, client development can be a very long and painful process before it feels productive.

So what is a firm to do?  Create your own instant gratification.  Consider ways to break down the tasks of client development and find ways to dish out immediate gratification for the completion of the smaller task.  Starting out with activities that the lawyer is more comfortable with will also make it easier to get them going.  For example, if a lawyer is uncomfortable with networking, instead of pushing him to join an association, have him contribute by writing an article on a topic of interest to a targeted client.  Publish the article on your website or better yet, in an industry publication (it’s easier than you think) and email your clients and prospects an excerpt of the article with a link.  This gives the lawyer the instant gratification that comes with recognition for a task well done, while furthering the firm’s business development plans.  Do this sort of thing several times, and your newly published lawyer will be inspired to do it again and before you know it, will be looking for other ways to do more.

By breaking up client development tasks into smaller segments, and rewarding those segments, Bubba will not have to wait months for the satisfaction.  Keep feeding the small accomplishments and the participation will grow on its own.

“Anyone Can Cook.” What Law Firms Can Learn From Ratatouille About Business Development.

Samira Mery Lineberger, Esq.
 
“If you can find collaborators whose strengths compliment your own, the result can be more than the sum of its authors.”       Walter John Williams

In the popular animated Disney film, Ratatouille an unusually talent rat finds himself cooking in a famous restaurant in Paris, guided by the encouragement of his mentor, a famous, well-published chef who is known for his assertion that “anyone can cook.”  The antagonist, an equally famous food critic, scuffs at such a notion, but eventually appreciates its meaning when he realizes that strengths and talents can be found in the most unexpected places.  We learn that it is the combination of the individuals working together that made that make believe Paris restaurant successful.  By utilizing the strengths of its individuals in the various roles they excelled in, together they were able to create a great meal.  Law firms today can utilize this concept in developing a great marketing program.

A common complaint I hear from many managing partners is that when it comes to business development, some people are just not trainable.  In some ways, this is true.  Being a great lawyer does not necessarily equate to being a great rainmaker.  While most lawyers tend to be good advocates, there is more to rainmaking than winning debates and being persuasive.  Business development skills can be taught to a certain degree, but excellence in such skills is limited to those whose natural strengths compliment the work that needs to be done to develop business.  However, if the activities necessary for business development can be broken into difference categories, such as networking, speaking, researching, writing, etc., the number of lawyers that can contribute utilizing their natural strengths and talents can be increased, and thereby reduce the burden on the few lawyers that have strengths that naturally match the bulk of the business development activities.  Rather than trying to train all the lawyers to do all things, lawyers should focus on contributing to the business development of the firm in the ways that are more suited toward their natural strengths.  Networkers should network.  Speakers should speak.  Researchers should research.  Writers should write.  With the collective effort of each lawyer contributing based on their strengths, they can all “cook” and produce something greater than the sum of its parts.

A Cure for “Rainmaker Syndrome”

Why Law Firms Need Business Marketing Plans

Samira Mery Lineberger, Esq.

“Efficiency is doing things right; effectiveness is doing the right things.”       Peter Drucker

The vast majority of law firms in business today got their start off the backs of just a few very talented rainmakers.  Such was their talent that they were able to build a reasonably stable firm with as many as 20, 30, 40 or more attorneys working on business that was initiated by these talented few.  No business plan was needed.  These few rainmakers just seemed to know who to talk to, what associations to belong to, in short, how to network their way into creating enough clients to populate a firm. Unfortunately, this rainmaker “business plan” has its down side as many firms have recently experienced.  When a key rainmaker leaves, 10, 15, 20 attorneys are cut.  A big client leaves, 10, 15, 20 attorneys are without work.  Anyone practicing law more than ten years has seen the fluctuation and sometimes outright destruction of law firms once thought to be stable and established as a result of this “rainmaker reliance syndrome.”

Can current law firms built on this business model protect against this fate?  The business marketing plan is a start.  Firms that move away from the informal and loosely implemented marketing activities of a few to a more formal plan strategically implemented by coordinated  group efforts are more likely to develop and maintain a stable business base than those that continue, business as usual.

The benefits of a formal plan are many:  First, devising an effective plan requires an intense review of the current market conditions and a determination of the direction the firm wants to take in the future.   As a result, the decisions on how to proceed tend to be more thought out and well developed.  Second, it requires the identification of the specific markets to be targeted by the marketing efforts.  To be effective, marketing efforts need to be laser focused on the intended target.  Efforts taken in too many directions thin out resources, tend to be less coordinated and thereby less effective.  Third, a defined plan can be reviewed and referenced to keep things on track, and to avoid any miscommunication.  Fourth, written formal plans can be more easily analyzed and measured for effectiveness, so that future plans can be adjusted appropriately.

In short, the process of developing a business marketing plan is not just an academic exercise; it is the creation of document that represents the collective agreement of the firm as to where the firm wants to go, and more importantly, what the firm has determined are the right things that need to be done to get there.